PDF Itsy Rabbit Meets Someone Smaller Than Herself (The Adventures of Itsy Rabbit)

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Robert Rankin fans; anybody with a couple of hours to spare and the need for a fun book. I guess some of the honeymoon feel of finding a new author is wearing off, because now I'm starting to see the formula in his books. This was still a hysterical read, though.

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I'm really not into murder mysteries as such, but the idea of a serial killer loose in Toy City, killing off fairy tale characters, was pretty fun. This was another totally gratuitous bit of mind candy, but I guess that's okay sometimes. Jun 04, Paul rated it it was amazing.

The rich are being methodically murdered and two detectives are trying to solve the crimes before anyone else, or themselves, get killed.

The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse by Robert Rankin

It should probably be mentioned that the book takes place in Toy City. One of the most entertaining facets of the story are the authors use of unusual language tricks throughout the book. Alliterations are peppered profusely in scenes dealing with food and dining. The sentence "Eddie was in trouble deep, and such trouble troubled him deeply" for example. At first, I was put off, but then started enjoying the the flavor it added to the setting and plot.

The plot was amazing and it remained true to the thriller genre. Mar 31, Libby rated it did not like it Shelves: Well, I tried, not once but twice. I found this book via the "if you like this author, you may like this author" type recommendation. It's interesting because the reviews of this book are so spilt. People either really like it or don't, and what's interesting is that the same people likely agree on other books.

For me, there is way too much dialogue in th Well, I tried, not once but twice. For me, there is way too much dialogue in this book and not enough plot.

A place for the mind to wander

In that case it's simply tiresome and forced. Apologies to those who really enjoyed this book, I really wanted to like it but my recommendation is to skip it and go straight to Jasper Ffore's The Big Over Easy which also covers the tragic death of Humpty Dumpty in a much more entertaining style. The Big Over Easy View all 5 comments. Jul 15, Jim rated it really liked it Shelves: Incredibly clever story chock full of parables and more than a few analogies comparing the fictional Toy City of Bunnies and the way we live today..

This is my first Rankin read; I am certain to read more of his work. Silly on it's surface in a good way but sardonic in wit and humor. Rankin knows how to spin a fluid tale. May 02, Diane rated it really liked it. Okay, unlike a lot of the other reviewers of this book, I didn't pick this up because somebody suggested it might remind me of Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman.

In which case I might very well have been disappointed. I got this book because I was perusing the stacks of my local library and the title caught my eye. I checked the book out without ever looking at the blurb or the inside cover and I had no earthly idea whatsoever what it was about until I opened it. Note that I do like Pratchett and Okay, unlike a lot of the other reviewers of this book, I didn't pick this up because somebody suggested it might remind me of Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman.

Note that I do like Pratchett and Gaiman very much and that the reason I was in Robert Rankin's section of the library to start with was that I was looking for Ian Rankin, who writes Scots police procedural mystery novels "tartan noir" , so by happy coincidence I am probably part of the target market for a surreal and humorous mystery novel of the British and pseudo-noir variety.

Which is what this is. Coming to this book with no expectations whatsoever, not knowing the author or anything else about him or about the book: I thoroughly enjoyed it. I thought it was clever and funny as all get-out. Probably not great literature, no, but then what is? I will be looking for Robert Rankin books in future. Fun and sometimes funny, and really good for a light read that doesn't take itself seriously.

I'm not an enormous fan of Robert Rankin based on this book, but I'm certainly willing to pick up another should it cross my path.

The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse

Which it will, since there's one on my shelf already. The overall idea isn't that unusual: But this is a more cynical, more adult version, with a certain sting in the humour so Fun and sometimes funny, and really good for a light read that doesn't take itself seriously. But this is a more cynical, more adult version, with a certain sting in the humour sometimes. Oct 16, Stephanie rated it really liked it Recommends it for: From the witty and twisted mind of Robert Rankin, we revisit the nursery rhymes of our childhood in a most gruesome way.

From the death by boiling of Humpty Dumpty to the brutal shepherd's-crook-in-unspeakable-places killing of Little Boy Blue, Eddy Bear and Jack must search Toy Town to find a serial killer. The book is a satire of war, celebrity, religion, and probably some things I missed, and the ending will truly surprise you. Oct 10, Elspeth rated it it was amazing Shelves: I love British humor and this book excels in it!

Dry, witty, and so very interesting! Apr 14, Hilary rated it really liked it. Jack is an ordinary fellow who leaves his factory job to seek his fortune in the big city. What he finds in Toy City, however, is a smart-mouthed detective teddy bear named Eddie, famous nursery rhyme characters, dollies and tintoys and rubber policemen, a kindly old toymaker--and a serial killer. Not for the faint of heart, chock full of naughty bits, off-color humor, and gratuitous violence, this novel is a hilarious satire of the hard-boiled detective novel.

Both its premise and its language a Jack is an ordinary fellow who leaves his factory job to seek his fortune in the big city. Both its premise and its language are quite clever, although there are moments when judicious editing would have improved it. Altogether I found it to be pretty adorable. It helps that I love teddy bears. Jan 03, Karen Germain rated it it was ok. It felt a bit too quirky, like Rankin was trying too hard. Good thing it was a very quick read!

One bonus, I love the title! Also, I did enjoy reading the chapters that involved the detectives going to the television taping. It is obvious that Rankin has been part of a studio audience! The book provided a few good laughs, but failed to really grab my attention. Jan 07, Altivo Overo rated it liked it Shelves: If you've seen the film Who Framed Roger Rabbit? At first glance, the idea of Rankin's novel seems entertaining. I was especially intrigued by the notion of a live teddy bear detective, who drinks too much beer and asks to be stood on his head so it will make him drunk before it runs out through his feet.

In practice, I found the parody quickly became repetitive and the jokes started to fall flat. Picture a Roger Rabbit type story, but substitute a city of live toys and nursery rhyme characters for the Toontown in Wolf's story. A series of unexplained murders, told from the viewpoint of a naive and rather insensitive human boy who stumbles into the plotline and is recruited to serve as Eddie Bear's assistant while masquerading as the bear's missing boss.

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It had potential, but the execution just didn't quite work for me. Perhaps you'll have better luck than I did. If not, there's always the real Roger Rabbit. If you like this one, there is a sequel entitled The Toyminator. He's inventive with a good turn of phrase - in this book he makes excellent use of the repetition of words and phrases with slightly different meanings - but, somehow, I just don't find his writing style very engaging.

This is the story of young Jack heading to The City to seek his fortune and finding a city entirely unlike the one he had expected - a toytown filled with clockwork bartenders and ja I don't know what it is, but Robert Rankin is one of those authors I wish I enjoyed more than I do. This is the story of young Jack heading to The City to seek his fortune and finding a city entirely unlike the one he had expected - a toytown filled with clockwork bartenders and jack-in-the-boxes and teddy bears, and finding himself embroiled in a noir detective tale involving the murders of Humpty Dumpty and other fairy tale luminaries.

For such a light book albeit with murders and underage drinking and sex I found it a bit of a slog, and far less fun than it should have beem. This book is tons of fun. I was having too much fun to realize until about halfway through what an awesome allegory it was too. I'd describe it as a lighter, wittier, but easier Wicked Two of my particularly favorite moments: None of us are perfect, are we?

This is known as 'The Particularly Stupid Theory'. Sep 08, Jason rated it it was amazing. Brilliant book, reminded me a lot of Roger Rabbit, but much darker. Somebody it brutally killing off the inhabitants of Toy Town, those inhabitants are the characters from nursery rhymes who are now rich. This book is a great place to start reading Robert Rankin, the well known characters helps you to get a grip on the totally mad style of Rankin.

One of my favourite authors and this is one of his best books. There is a sequel that I've never got around to reading so will have to try that this ye Brilliant book, reminded me a lot of Roger Rabbit, but much darker. There is a sequel that I've never got around to reading so will have to try that this year. Nov 27, Watoosa rated it did not like it. How I loved the title. Too bad the book wasn't my cup of tea. Feb 19, Vivienne rated it really liked it Shelves: I was trapped under my purring giant black cat one morning last week and this novel was within reach without disturbing him.

Yet once started I found that I was enjoying it so much that I kept on reading even after my cat had wandered off and finished it in a single sitting only stopping for refreshments. It was very enjoyable and an easy read. Some of the humour was a bit laddish, such as obvious jokes about bears and the woods, but it was less gross-out humour than the cover blurb suggested. T I was trapped under my purring giant black cat one morning last week and this novel was within reach without disturbing him.

The same with the promised gratuitous sex and violence, though maybe I've been hardened by too many crime novels on the latter. Eddie the Teddy Bear was a brilliant character as was spotting the presence of various Maguffins. It struck me quite early on that the plot did sound similar to Jasper Fforde's Nursery Crimes books though looking at the publication dates Rankin's was published first. This was selected by one of my library reading groups and I wasn't expecting it to be that well received given its genre. As it turned out there was a broad spectrum of responses with a few of us loving it and others being disinterested and a couple not reading beyond the first chapters.

This this was pretty much what I had expected given the composition of the group. Another difficulty with a comic novel for a reading group is that aside from whether we enjoyed it or not there wasn't a great deal of issues or themes to discuss. Instead, we shared what scenes we'd enjoyed and compared it to other comic fantasy writers such as Fforde and Pratchett. If you've never read a Robert Rankin Far-Fetched fiction novel before, I'd kindly like to ask you not to start with this one.

Whilst humorous, well-written and full of all the trademark Rankin humour and running gags, the plot falls very short and barely do the characters stretch beyond anything other than bring characters. It is not without humour, but not as full of it as many of his others are. The characters, whilst likable who does not enjoy an alcoholic teddy bear?

It is a very interesting plot, but I do not think he executed it very well here. It still made me laugh out loud during the interval at The Pirates of Penzance, though. Apr 06, Almeta rated it it was ok Shelves: Because Easter is coming up, I thought that I would try one of the many "chocolate cozies" listed by other members. This one, The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse , reminded me of chocolate loving Erma Bombeck's confession from one of her books, that went something like this If these two assessments ma Because Easter is coming up, I thought that I would try one of the many "chocolate cozies" listed by other members.

If these two assessments make you want to read more, then this silly book is for you. The Second Oldest Profession. Sep 13, Louise rated it really liked it Shelves: Light-hearted and fun - especially if you can remember your nursery rhymes. Jack heads out to make his fortune in "the City"; on arriving in Toy City much larger these days than Toy Town! Innocent bystanders such as Mother Goose and Wibble also get the chop! Or is that really what he's doing? Wh Light-hearted and fun - especially if you can remember your nursery rhymes.

Who is the mysterious Mr Sredna? Who is the "evil twin"? And who keeps leaving the hollow chocolate bunnies at the murder scenes? Sep 14, Ryan Mishap rated it liked it Shelves: And where did Jasper Fforde steal his ideas for the Nursery Crime series from? It is a nutty thing, and fun.

A lad travels to the city to try and make his fortune and it turns out the city is full of characters from nursery rhymes, faerie tales, and myths. Thus, while a shark feeds as nature intends, in folklore the shark tends to be stereotyped as "cruel", implying a conscious choice to inflict pain. Some stereotypes are based on mistaken or grossly oversimplified impressions; spotted hyenas , for example, commonly portrayed as cowardly scavengers, are efficient pack hunters with complex social structures.

Many misconceptions about animals were born out of ignorance.

Stereotypes of animals

Due to a lack of biological research people were scared of certain species of whom they knew very little, apart from urban legends or occasional attacks that led to human deaths. Others were considered to be dangerous, merely because of their frightening appearance. This has led some animals to be portrayed as monsters , such as spiders , snakes , crocodiles , wolves , bats , rhinoceroses , gorillas , lions , tigers , bears , eagles , hawks , vultures , piranhas , sharks , whales , scorpions , The depiction of them as "monsters" is another example of oversimplification.

Animals just follow their natural instincts and are not out to attack people, unless they happen to feel threatened and are in a position where they can't easily get away. Even predators will only possibly attack when hungry or to protect their offspring. In most cases animals are far more scared of people than the other way around and will likely run away.

In the opposite direction several animals who have a non-threatening appearance and actually look cute, cuddly, graceful and playful are often portrayed as adorable: Various pet owners tend to treat their pets almost as if they are toys or cute little babies. Once again, this is a serious oversimplification. Monkeys , for instance, may appear to be harmless, but like all animals can return to their natural instincts when people least suspect it and bite.

Despite these considerations, the use of animal stereotypes the same goes to stereotypes of machinery in real life and fiction are generally much less problematic than it is for human stereotypes. India has a rich tradition of animal stories and beast fables , including one of the world's oldest collections of stories, the Panchatantra and its later derivatives such as the Hitopadesha.

Throughout these fables, the talking animals behave as humans unlike the Aesop model, in which animals behave as animals , and are used to invoke characters with stereotypical personalities. There is also a distinction between wild and domesticated animals. Some common stereotypes include:. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For repetitive animal behaviors, see Stereotypy non-human.

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